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Parshas Bechokotai (5774)

"Amelia Bedelia" and the Oral Tradition

"Now let's see what this list says," Amelia Bedelia read, "CHANGE THE TOWELS IN THE GREEN BATHROOM." Amelia Bedelia found the green bathroom.
"Those towels are very nice. Why change them?" she thought.
Then Amelia Bedelia remembered what Mrs. Rogers had said. She must do just what the list had told her.
"Well, all right," said Amelia Bedelia.
She snipped a little here and a little there. And she changed those towels.
"Now what?" "PUT THE LIGHTS OUT WHEN YOU FINISH IN THE LIVING ROOM.” Amelia Bedelia thought about this a minute.
She switched off the lights. Then she carefully unscrewed each bulb. And Amelia Bedelia put the lights out.
"So those things need to be aired out, too. Just like pillows and babies. Oh, I do have a lot to learn."

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It is a foundation of our faith to believe that G-d gave Moses and the Jewish people an oral explanation of the Torah along with the written text. This oral tradition is now essentially preserved in the Talmud and Midrashim.

However, there are many Jews today who are skeptical when it comes to accepting a so-called "oral tradition", claiming that the Talmud and all the interpretations of the literal text of the Torah were the product of later Rabbinic scholars who might have had hidden agendas and fanciful imaginations.

Some of us might be willing to accept the notion of G-d revealing Himself to the Jewish people and giving us His Torah – the Written Torah, that is - but anything other than the Five Books of Moses is circumspect.

If we study Jewish history, we will find that this is an old claim that was made well over 2000 years ago by a breakaway sect of Jews known as the Saduccees. While they accepted the authority of the Written Torah, they rejected the oral traditions and interpretations of the Sages, and they preached a literal reading of the text of the Torah ... which led to some interesting and strange practices. I guess one could say that the Saduccees were the "Amelia Bedelias" of the ancient world.

I will give you some examples of what can happen when we take every word of the Written Torah literally, without relying on a much-needed Oral Tradition.

G-d commands the Jewish people in Numbers (15:38): "They shall make for themselves tzitzis (fringes) on the corners of their garments ..... It shall constitute tzitzis for you, that you may see it ....." The Torah never writes explicitly that we should wear the fringed garment. If anything, the Torah says that we should see the tzitzis, implying that we should hang the fringed garment (today called the prayer shawl) on our wall in a noticeable place.

And that's exactly what the Saduccees did! They hung their tzitzis on the wall, but would never wear them.

How about the Sabbath? It is one of the Ten Commandments. Yet in the entire Written Torah, virtually no details are given as to how it should be kept! So how are we to know what to do? Should we keep the Sabbath by lighting candles .... or maybe a trip to the park with the kids was what G-d had in mind? Or maybe it should be left up to each individual to celebrate the Sabbath in his/her own way?

The details can be found in the Oral Torah, of course. As G-d said, "You shall keep the Sabbath holy, as I have commanded your fathers" (Jeremiah 17:22) - obviously referring to an oral tradition. But I bet that Amelia Bedelia and her predecessors the Saduccees sure would have been confused!

ON THE MORROW OF WHICH DAY?

Let me give you one more example, which has relevance to the upcoming holiday of Shavuos (The Festival of Weeks).

In the Written Torah, G-d commands the Jewish people to celebrate the holiday of Shavuos. But He doesn't tell them directly which day they should celebrate. Rather, the Torah states in Leviticus (23:15) "You shall count for yourselves - from the morrow of the rest day seven weeks ....." The Torah writes further that at the end of those seven weeks of counting you shall celebrate the Festival of Weeks.

Now, if we are to believe that only the Written Torah was Divinely given, but not the Oral Tradition, then we are forced to conclude that G-d was playing some kind of cruel joke on His Chosen People!

I mean, come on, can't you help us out here a little, G-d? On the morrow of the "rest day" we should count seven weeks and then celebrate Shavuos? Which one of the 52 "rest days" of the year are you referring to, G-d? Are we going to play Twenty Questions here, or what?

As a matter of fact, the Saduccees, for lack of a better option, decided to count the seven weeks from the day after the first Saturday after Passover, which means that Shavuos would always come out on a Sunday!

Of course, the Oral Torah helps us out here as always, and tells us exactly what G-d had in mind with that very vague and ambiguous reference.

Now, when Amelia Bedelia makes such mistakes and follows everything Mrs. Rogers tells her to do - literally - it makes for an interesting and comical children's book, which we can't help but chuckle at. But it's not so funny when the stakes are higher - when the very foundation of our faith and of our lives - our beloved Torah - is taken so literally as to become vague and confusing, and, G-d forbid, almost comical.

THE OBVIOUS QUESTION

Okay, so let's assume that G-d gave us two Torahs - a Written Torah and an Oral Tradition along with it to clarify things - but we still have to ask ourselves why would G-d do such a thing? Why couldn't He just write everything clearly in the Written Torah? This way He could have avoided all the problems and divisions among our people, whereby some of us accept both Torahs, and some reject the Oral Torah, because it seems to have originated with a bunch of Rabbis, instead of being Divinely given and inspired!

I once posed this question to a man from West Orange, New Jersey, with whom I had been studying on a weekly basis. His ten-year-old son had joined us that evening, and the young boy came up with an answer that is, in my opinion, quite profound, and also has a connection to the very first words in this week's Torah portion.

In Leviticus (26:3), the Torah states: "If you will follow My decrees and observe My commandments and perform them; then I will provide your rains in their time”.

The verse seems to be repetitious. What is the difference between "following my decrees" and "observing my commandments"? Rashi, the great Bible commentator, explains, based on the Oral Tradition, that "following My decrees" - which is read in Hebrew bechukosai tay-laychu - means that we should toil in Torah study. Whereas the next words in the verse refer to the performance of the actual commandments.

It is difficult to understand where the Oral Tradition got the idea of “toiling in Torah” from the Torah’s words bechukosai tay-laychu, which simply mean “to follow My decrees”.

Rabbi Shneur Zalman of Liadi, the first Lubavitcher Rebbe, once explained this strange oral tradition as follows:

There are two methods of writing - one with ink and paper and the other by engraving on stone. The difference between the two is that when one writes with ink, the words do not become one with the paper, making it possible for the message on the paper to be erased over time. When a message is engraved into stone, however, the words and the stone are one unit, so that the message remains in the stone permanently.

The Hebrew word bechukosai, or decrees, comes from the root word chakikah, which means engraving. G-d is teaching us that if we want the words and the message of the Torah to leave an indelible and permanent impression upon us, we must study them intensely and toil in them, so that we become one with the Torah that we study and it becomes engraved on our hearts.

And that's exactly what the little boy answered to my question. He said that if the entire Torah had been written out for us, without our having to put any effort in trying to explain it and get to the deeper meaning behind the literal text, it wouldn't become a part of us and would leave no permanent impact.

This is one of many reasons why the Oral Tradition is so very important and central in Judaism.

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